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Questions About McCormick | The 'CURE' for your Vocation

Category: Questions About McCormick


CURE is back!

When we last spoke, dear readers, McCormick was poised for a much needed Christmas break. Well, Christmas has come and gone, as has our January term. Now that Spring semester has begun, CURE is back to write fun and informative articles about life as a student at McCormick. We’ll still update approximately twice a week!

A lot has been afoot since December that I am excited to tell you about! One of the most exciting pieces of news is that we have decided to give a 25% tuition discount to students who apply, are accepted and matriculate in Fall 2013. Details can be found here. To be sure you qualify, contact your admissions representative or admissions staff, Jamie and JC.

We’re also very pleased to announce that we have planned additional opportunities for prospective students to visit and get the McCormick experience. Not only will we have our Inquiry into Ministry weekend as usual, but two additional Evenings of Discernment. With the difficult schedules that many of us have, we understand a full weekend is not possible for everyone, but you still want to visit and meet with students and faculty. During our Evenings of Discernment, you will attend a 3 hour session, inclusive of dinner, that will cover an introduction to our Masters Level classes, a panel of professors, and a mini class experience. Evenings of Discernment is also a free program! And as always, we have rooms available in our guest housing for any out of town guests!

Peace,

Wes

Greetings friends! After a rejuvenating Thanksgiving break, the CURE is back! This week I wanted to bring you Thanksgiving reflections, and happened to read the blog of one of my great friends here at McCormick, Tyler Orem. He wrote exactly what I was hoping for, and so with his permission, we’re re-blogging his original post.  Tyler is in his second year and is completing a dual MDiv and MSW. He’s also one of McCormick’s great deacons! Enjoy his post!

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Before Thanksgiving I had the usual weekly joy of spending Wednesday evening with the middle schoolers of Knox Presbyterian Church, Naperville. We had recently completed a rather dull study by Tim Keller, so I had the freedom to make a stand-alone Thanksgiving lesson. The challenge was how to move beyond the annual “What are you thankful for?” discussion into something that might actually carry some meaning. Thinking about what should be soul-crushing irony in celebrating the cooperation and mutuality between First Nation peoples and European settlers, I decided to have a discussion about how we as relatively new people on the land have given thanks to those who were here before us.

I had my Charlie Brown clip all set up and was prepared to get up on my soapbox to rail against the systemic evils that resulted in the founding of our country and permeate society to this day. In short, I was ready to use my bully pulpit as the middle school leader to teach 600 years of oppression, destruction, and genocide in 20 minutes to a group of pre-teens excited about getting a short break from school.

Within the first 3 minutes I realized that my method was madness. This is a bright group of kids, and they were getting the intellectual gist of it. But my ambitious lecturing was obviously not having the desired meaningfulness. So, I quickly switched to the Charlie Brown Mayflower clip in which the Pilgrims learn agriculture from horrifyingly caricatured “Indians” and then sit down to feast. My goal was to point out how the characters were portrayed and how the tables for feasting were segregated.

Then one of my students raised a hand and said, “It’s like the Native Americans have to sit at the kids’ table.”

With that single observation, every person in the room got it. The sixth-grader gave infinitely more meaning to the lesson than anything I was going to teach. Kids have been relegated to the lesser table all of their lives and have a keen awareness of what it means to be pushed to the side, ignored, and patronized. The analogy for First Nation peoples is surely incomplete and too mild, but it works perfectly to help middle schoolers feel and understand.

My ongoing prayer is that we ever seek to make the table for feasting open and abundant, that there might be enough room at the mesa for all to sit together and share their lives.

In reflecting on this Thanksgiving, I am thankful for my expanding family whose love never ceases to amaze me, for the adventures being lived by my brother and cousins, for friends who regularly join my family, and for middle schoolers who speaker and understand with a profundity beyond me.

Grazie, Naa-ni, Arigatou, and Again I Say, “Thank You.”

I did not plan on being a church planter. And, I don’t mean that in a God-was-calling-me-there-but-I-refused-to-listen-to-God’s-voice kind of way. It was literally not even a blip on my radar. So, when the opportunity came up to be a planting pastor with Urban Village Church, an initiative with the UMC, I really had to think on it.

I began talking with Trey Hall and Christian Coon, the lead pastors of UVC about a year ago. At the same time, they were having conversations with Benjamin Reynolds, a PhD student at Chicago Theological Seminary who had pastored a large African American Baptist congregation in Colorado Springs. I was caught by how they really listened, were responsive, and sought to follow the Spirit’s lead in their own discernment about us as their partners in ministry. I realized that, in a risky endeavor like church planting, it was important for me to know I had passionate, dynamic, and intelligent partners who would not only recognize and value the gifts and experiences that I brought to the table, but also take me seriously as a partner. I didn’t plan on church planting, but once I accepted the call, I became excited. It was the best intersection of my gifts and passions: creative communications, graphic design, organization, seeing the gospel change lives, and having fun.

So, why plant churches in time of mainline decline? The simple answer is that there are people who want to engage questions of spirituality and faith, but they are not finding what they need. Rather than paint with a broad brushstroke, I will speak to the particular context where Benjamin and I are doing our work. In my conversations with folks (most, but not all, of whom were young adults) in the Woodlawn and Hyde Park neighborhoods, I have come across 4 types – People who have:

1)  given up trying to find something in the neighborhood and go somewhere else.

2)  given up trying to find a church and don’t go to church.

3)  settled on a place, but aren’t all that satisfied

4)  been burned or rejected by the church at some point.

Many people are looking for a sense of connection and community; where someone notices when they’ve been away or knows to ask about what’s happening in their lives. They are also looking for a place where their questions are not ignored but taken seriously and engaged; where doubt is not equated with unbelief. Additionally, families are looking for a place where their children can be equipped to think about faith and faithful living that is rooted in the gospel with intelligence and meaning. There is also a unique need that UVC on the south side can address: being a faith community that welcomes and affirms people of color (and their families) across the spectrum of sexual orientation. Finally, our vision for Urban Village as a whole (and particularly on the south side) is to be a multi-racial faith community that does not minimize difference but engage it for the sake of being a fuller expression of God’s kindom.

McCormick was important in equipping me with certain tools in this work:

  • Developing a posture of life-long learning
  • Opportunities for engaging in conversations with people who come from a diversity of backgrounds and life experiences
  • A network of creative colleagues who both support and challenge me
  • Knowledge of ministry in an urban context (particularly Chicago)
  • Public speaking and preaching
  • Supportive faculty and staff
  • Tools for shaping creative liturgy and worship

There are other key tools that McCormick did not (and in some cases, could not) equip me with, so I had to learn or obtain elsewhere:

  • Perseverance
  • Humor
  • Graphic design and marketing
  • Organization/Administration
  • External networks and connections
  • Creative ways to do evangelism/outreach
  • The nuts and bolts of church planting
  • The practice of trying to do church differently
  • Community organizing

Being a church planter is hard work! You have to put yourself out there again and again, initiating conversations with people, risking rejection and judgement on a daily basis. But, I do not regret my decision. There is something very powerful and humbling about the work of planting churches. You get a front row seat in bearing witness to the kind of work that God can do through a broken vessel (moi) to help make the neighborhood just a little bit better and the gospel just a little more present in the world.

This is a brief overview of some aspects of my work as a church planter. If you have questions or are interested in church planting and would like to join Benjamin and myself in this work, feel free to contact me at emcginley@mccormick.edu

Today we continue on our in depth look at relationships and how life is affected by being in seminary. A large portion of our students, both commuter and residential, have families. As such, people with spouses and children face a unique set of circumstances while studying to fulfill God’s call on their lives. I’m no expert on the subject, so I’ve asked two fellow class mates to share their perspectives – Jeff Courter and Ken Crews. Jeff and Ken are both second year students- I have asked them to share because they have had experiences living on and off campus, being full and part time, having a spouse also in school, etc. I feel like their two stories help to show what it’s really like for folks with families to study at McCormick.

First up is Jeff:

Living in the residential building with my wife and children has been interesting, to say the least, especially now that my wife is also going to school.  Five students in one family – someone please stop the madness!  Books and papers are everywhere.  We don’t have family meals – we graze, like sheep.  We have become a small band of hunter-gatherers, foraging in the refrigerator in search of nourishment to keep us alive, stopping at exotic stores like Aldi’s or Save-A-Lot to stock up on food to be consumed without having to be cooked.  We have acquired a taste for raw produce.

How does this lifestyle affect my seminary studies?  My apartment life has become a lab experiment in communal tribal living…this living arrangement is intentional and happenstance at the same time.  We live in a mixture of organization and chaos…It is not painless, and we have each seen more challenges in our lives than we have ever undergone until now.  Negotiating conflicting schedules, adjusting to using public transportation instead of driving in suburbia, now being connected more by school breaks on the calendar than by family events – this year has added new stresses to our family life.  Yet each one of us looks forward to a brighter future, each of us anticipating doing what we love to do in new careers.  After all, that’s the promise and premise of education – to enable and equip us to fully engage in a vocation, in the fullest sense John Calvin used that term.

For me personally, I have thoroughly enjoyed living with and among colleagues and peers.  I get to discuss things that most Americans avoid – spiritual issues!  It’s a little like being part of an underground culture, without the persecution and oppression (thank God for that!).  For me, the community of faith is essential.  It’s what we are called to build.  It’s the embodiment of the Kingdom of God in our world.  It’s why I came here, and what I long to help develop and create.

This has been an exciting time for me.  I have learned from women and men who have great learning, who have devoted much of their lives to research and are handing that experience down to us -  not only on subjects like theology, history and languages, but also essential knowledge about practicing spirituality and self-care, and understanding human relationships in pastoral ministry.  McCormick’s instructors are some of the most interesting and caring people I have ever met.

I have also met some of the most enthusiastic and committed men and women as fellow students.  My hope for both our denomination and the greater Christian Church has grown, due to seeing and hearing from my peers.  What excites me is being able to share my vision, and hear the vision of others, which are often similar to mine.  It’s like “we get it” together, seeing our responsibility to social justice, to the transforming good news of Jesus Christ, to our stewardship of God’s creation, and to a greater sharing of love and fellowship to the world.  These students are my partners in a Christian movement of transformation of our world, from what it is to what God wants it to be.  While our callings and paths may diverge after this time together, we are linked in this great endeavor, and will carry one another from this place in our hearts and memories.

This is a transitional time for all of us.  Many come to McCormick with new relationships – new families, new spouses, new children…many come here after relationships end.   We also establish new relationships while we are here!  But most of us will go forth from here to someplace else; our time together is temporary, and we understand this.

Even so, whether permanent or temporary, life is all about relationships.  People will come and go in our lives, some for longer periods of time than others, some affecting us more than others.  Some become relationships we call family, and some become our spiritual family.  McCormick is an institution devoted to helping us grow and develop our relationships with God and one another.  To me, this is the most important lesson we can ever learn.  Our relationships define us, and affect our families, our churches, our societies, and our world.  Even temporary relationships are important, and can change us permanently.  Relationships are like any other growing and living thing – they must be nourished and attended to in order to thrive.  We must be intentional in our interactions with one another, in order to make our relationships positive ones.

My family is changing, as all families do.  Two of my children are in college, and my youngest is applying for college.  My wife has returned to college. Seminary and college are each a preparatory and transitory phase in most of our lives.  My children are moving on with their lives.  My wife and I will move on from here as well when I am finished with my studies.  While this is not my last year, the day is coming when I will finish and leave McCormick.  I will likely grieve having to leave, because I love being here.  But this is a preparatory phase, not a final destination.  There is a larger objective for us outside McCormick.

I sometimes think of McCormick like a sort of cyclotron – a particle energizer which accelerates subatomic particles towards the speed of light.  The more I learn, the more I accelerate, and the more energy I absorb, it seems.  Sometimes I am anxious to burst forth and do what I came here to be equipped to do – ministry!  I love being here, but I am also ready to be sent forth, like the disciples of Jesus.  The day for me to go forth is coming quickly – life moves fast, as my family life has shown me.

Meanwhile, I am trying to make the most of every minute, every learning experience, and every relationship I have while I am here.  The more energy I absorb, the more I will take with me.

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Last, but certainly not least, is Ken:

What was I thinking when I responded to God’s call to attend seminary? The reading assignments alone can be a full-time job (thanks Ken and Bob!), not to mention actually having to attend class, write papers, try to conjure up some creative idea for a PIF project, and make time for the occasional study break! Now add two children (Owen 9, Evelyn 5), a wife (Heather, you can ask her age!), a dog (the amazingly lazy, Sasha), a part-time job, and a commute to and from Indiana everyday to the mix and you have yourself quite the adventure. While all of this creates a rather demanding time schedule, I wouldn’t trade any of it for all the riches in this world. Why? Because, I am precisely where God wants me to be. I am able to engage in deep conversation with wonderful friends in a unique community, and at the end of the day be delighted when my daughter, Evelyn, finds it comical that she and dad are both learning their letters – English for her, and Greek for me!

Be assured, this adventure is only possible because of the support of many amazing family and friends. It has meant that my wife, Heather, had to return to full-time work outside of the home because I left a well paying job to follow God’s call. She never hesitated, and has always supported me in my journey. It has required many family and friends to sacrifice time to look after our children as I pursue my studies and Heather works full-time, and it has required that my children sacrifice time with mom and dad while we’re both away from the home more. Sometimes it has even required professors and EA’s to sacrifice classroom space when my kids had to sit through class with me (thanks Paula, Katie, and Sylvia!!!).

Although attending McCormick has required quite a bit of sacrifice, it has been so much more rewarding. My family and I have grown closer to one another because of all the change in our lives, and we have all grown closer to God as we move along this path together. We are always discovering new ways in which we come together as a family, and new ways in which God is working in our lives and providing for us as we move along the journey. Our journey through seminary as a family is proof that God uses many unique people in many unique ways to accomplish the work of divine love.

May God bless and keep you all, and your families (whatever shape they take!)….

So there we have it! If you have questions pertaining to your family, don’t be afraid to ask the friendly Admissions office workers, or even our dean of Students.

We’re not done with this series yet, so keep checking back for more students responding to what it’s been like for them and their relationships while in seminary!

Peace and Blessings,

Wes

McCormick has been preparing women and men for ministry for well over 150 years, and today on the CURE you’ll get an insiders look at what life is like when you leave the classroom and get into the ministry God has called you to! I’ve asked two recent McCormick grads to share  about their lives after seminary and how McCormick helped shape them to live into their calls. Sharing is 2012 M.Div graduate TC Anderson who works as the director of Youth Ministry at at the First Presbyterian Church of Arlington Heights and 2012 MTS Graduate Ryan Wallace, an organizer for the Civic Action network.

Up first is TC Anderson-

Did McCormick prepare me for my ministry? Yee…. Nnnn…. nes! It’s a complicated answer, so allow me to try and flush it out. First, I’m working in youth ministry because that’s where I’m called. I knew that going into seminary and it hasn’t changed. McCormick is very much focused on ministry from the pulpit. This does not mean that there aren’t classes or even professors geared towards other areas of ministry, just that the majority of what I was learning was for ministry from the pulpit. That being said, I think that McCormick did exactly what I needed McCormick to do to prepare me for my ministry going forward. I needed something to deepen my own faith, I needed something to expand my understanding of my religion, I needed something to connect me with other Theologians who both agree and disagree with me so that I could stay in contact with them when I needed to talk about this ministry. McCormick did all these things. Having worked in ministry for 7 years before going to McCormick I didn’t need a class to tell me what to expect in that ministry field. I have found that books and lessons can only take you so far in that respect anyway. Hardly ever does a problem happen exactly like one of your case studies. The only real way to prepare us for the ministry is to strengthen our faith, give us a support net, and increase the amount of knowledge we have about our beliefs, the rest is experiential. So I guess my answer, now that I’ve flushed it out more, is yes. McCormick did exactly what I needed to be done to prepare me for this crazy, unexpected, difficult, fulfilling thing called ministry. Thank you McCormick!

TC's ministry in Action!

And finally, Ryan Wallace –

I began in the MDiv program at McCormick in the fall of 2010, just a couple of months after formally initiating my ordination process in the Chicago Presbytery. I had sensed a call to congregational ministry from a very young age, but I entered McCormick with a genuine uncertainty about my future. I never felt reason to question my call to ministry, per se. It’s just that, as I grew older, the world got bigger and so did my notion of what “ministry” might mean.

And then, McCormick pried open my world more yet. Fellow students, professors, and classes challenged me to think about myself, my ministry, and the Church in new ways. I learned the difference between charity and justice. I reckoned with my identity as a straight white American male from a well-to-do suburb. And I came to the somewhat difficult realization that I don’t need to be Rev. Ryan Wallace to do God’s work in my community.

In February, I reclassified my degree from MDiv to Master of Theological Studies. And though I’m still in prayerful conversation about my ordination, I’m still not sure what, if any, formal leadership position I may one day hold in the Presbyterian Church. Nevertheless, I am quite confident that I am called to the ministry I’m now doing.

Today, I am a congregational organizer with the Civic Action Network at the Community Renewal Society, a 130 year-old Chicago organization that addresses racism and poverty through community organizing. Our network is comprised of some eighty-odd churches across the Chicago metropolitan area. I am the organizer for our member churches in Lake County and suburban Cook County. Ultimately, my goal is to develop leaders in those congregations who can mobilize its members to act as a force for change. Each year, we listen to the people in our churches to understand the issues they face in their communities, and together we build campaigns to create positive change. We fight for jobs for ex-offenders, housing for those without it, adequate funding for all our children’s schools, and gun control in our communities among other issues.

In our modern culture, I believe the Church is becoming irrelevant because we too often deliver a message about eternal salvation to a people who need and long for a message about salvation in the here and now. We, the Church, often declare our vision—full of love—for God’s kingdom on earth. But seldom do we acknowledge our latent power and set out to use it for the fulfillment of that vision. Reinhold Niebuhr said: “Power without love is tyranny, and love without power is sentimentality.” With his words in mind, let’s refuse to be the sentimental Church who dreams only of what could be or might be, and instead become the Church that plays a powerful role in the building of our communities that will be.

Thanks so much to TC and Ryan. I hope you’ve seen a little about the paths McCormick students might take after leaving seminary – but their stories are only two of the many many voices to be heard, so I encourage you to come and visit McCormick, talk to our students and faculty, speak with Alumni and see for yourself what McCormick can do for you and the ministry that God has called you to.

Our Fall Inquiry into Ministry is right around the corner – so take advantage! Register here: Fall IIM Registration

Greetings friends! After a semi-restful reading week, CURE is back! We look a bit different now, and we hope you like it.

It’s that time of the month where I give up control of the blog to my trusty side kick/pet interviewer extraordinaire, Norae, to interview the pets of McCormick – this week, Mika the cat.

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Yeah – I look cuddly don’t I? It’s just a ploy to get you close… then I’ll eat you. Mwahahahaha

Norae: Tell us your name and breed?
Mika: My name Mika, my breed is street fighting cat.

N: Street fighter, huh? Who is your human?
M: I call her Big Food Monster. Her real name is Mo or something, I don’t know, I don’t really pay attention.

N: How did you get him/her?
M: I let her live with me while my dad’s away flying planes off a boat for the Navy.

N: That sounds awfully nice of Big Food Monster. What’s your favorite place in your apartment?
M: The window, or right under the food monsters feet.

Ah, yes. The window. Where I can view my next kill.

N: Where is your favorite place outside of your apartment?
M: I’ve yet to implement my escape plan.

N: Good luck with that. What are your favorite treats?
M: Flowers

Fresh cut flowers – I like to pretend they scream as I munch on their beautiful deliciousness.

N: How about in your daily sustenance: do you prefer wet or dry food?

M: I like fancy expensive food and when the food monster buys something else I show my anger with her in unspeakable ways.

N: Um. Well. Okay, then. How many toys do you have? Which ones are your favorite?
M: I have lots of toys. I like to put them in places that will make the food monster trip over them, I also like to drowned them in my water dish so she knows how deadly I am. My favorite is the laser pointer, I almost had it last time!

N: What is your favorite way to pass time when you aren’t drowning toys?
M: Sleeping while the food monster reads, sitting where it is most inconvenient for the food monster, not having a job, judging people from the window, having staring contest with the food monster. In that order.

I must eat my food at the table with the food monster’s best china. I sometimes allow others to join me, but never the food monster.

N: What is one thing you think everyone should know about you?
M: The only human I like is the one the food monster calls “Riegel”.

N: Any last words of wisdom you want to share with everyone about youself?
M: Be afraid.

Well, um, there you have it: Mika, the really scary cat. Join me next month when I interview a cat that doesn’t make me want to cry.

- Norae, pet blogger of awesomeness

Greetings and Happy October!

Leaves are officially changing in Chicago, which means it’s Fall and officially the best time to explore all of Chicago’s neighborhoods! Once a month CURE brings you one of Chicago’s many neighborhoods. Not only are they part of our great city, but these neighborhoods are part of McCormick’s urban classroom. Up this week: Lake View!

As you can probably tell in the map, Lake View’s shape is a bit awkward. The yellow splotches in the middle are actually neighborhood – Wrigleyville on the left and Boystown on the right – that have been created within Lake View’s boundaries. From my time spent in Chicago it is clear that not a lot of people actually know Lake View’s boundaries, and for good reason, as neighborhoods tend to shift with time.

Despite Lake View’s ever changing shape, it is one of my favorite neighborhoods for many reasons. I had the opportunity to do some research on Lake View for a paper I wrote in my first year at McCormick, and what I learned was quite fascinating.

When Lake View was originally established, it was a small suburban community set between Chicago and Evanston. It was incorporated into Chicago in 1889, and has been a thriving neighborhood ever since. Lake View has since become a neighborhood full of young professionals and young families, as well as gay men.

Lake View and Boystown (which was created out of Lake View) is home to one of the largest amounts of youth homeless in the Mid-West. This partially attests to the grim reality that a lot of youth struggling with their sexual identity are not welcome in their families, and the kids have no where else to go. As Chicago, like many cities, is not the best at serving those needing the most support, several churches and other non-profits have provided space for the homeless youth to be themselves. Local laws keep beds for homeless youth at a minimum, but Lake View Presbyterian and Broadway United Methodist Church, as well as the Night Ministry, are able to still do what they can. McCormick Students have been big parts in both Cafe Pride at Lake View and Youth Lounge at Broadway, and they continue to be.

Lake View, as well as Boystown, is also home to Chicago’s Pride Parade – which is one of the biggest in the country – held the last Sunday in June each year. Local churches, included Broadway United Methodist and Lake View Presbyterian, march in solidarity with the LGBTQ community.

Lake View is home to many congregations in which to worship, including Lake View Presbyterian and Broadway, as well as many others. Other cool aspects of Lake View include on of Panera Bread’s pay-what-you-can restaurants.

Me and my lovely wife at last years Pride Parade

Thanks for checking into one of Chicago’s many wonderful neighborhoods.

Check back on Friday for a look into what it is like to be married in Seminary!

Well hello friends,

Norae Pitts-Whittington here! Wes has allowed me temporary use of the CURE blog for my very own special interviews.

This year I’ll bring you a monthly look at some of the really amazing four-legged folks at McCormick. I am usually due for my monthly spotlight on the second Friday of the month, but this interview is so great I just couldn’t wait! I got to sit down with one of the coolest dogs at McCormick – Albus Labuschagne-Rhodes!

Albus hanging out at home, being awesome

Tell us your name and breed.
My name is Albus, which means “white” in Latin.  It would be a fitting name, since I’m a Havanese breed of Bichon and have white hair, but, actually, I’m named after the fictional wizard Albus Dumbledore (yeah, my owners are those kind of Harry Potter fans).
Who are your humans?
Dirk Labuschagne (A 2nd year M.Div student at McCormick) and Amy Rhodes.
How did you come to get them?
Dirk and Amy adopted me from the shelter PAWS in north Chicago.  My previous owners were an older couple who had to give me up for medical reasons, and Dirk and Amy played with me for less than two minutes before they decided I was theirs.  What can I say, I’m charming!
How do you like your living arrangements?
I pretty much have the run of the place.  Except for the couch.  And Dirk and Amy’s bed.  My paws make an awesome “pitter-patter” sound as I run on the hardwood floors, so I run around a lot.  Love it!
What’s your favorite place in your apartment?
You can usually find me in one of three places:
1. curled up in the corner where the couch meets the wall. Sounds kinda crazy, I know, but my brain power isn’t really up to explaining why I like that corner so much.
2. My bed next to Dirk’s desk.  It’s base when we’re playing tag, it hides my raw hides when I’m feeling especially ‘dog-like,’ and I can push it around with my nose. Great place.
3.  My crate.  It’s my den, it’s my dog cave, it’s pretty much amazing.  You can find me there, listening to NPR, when Dirk and Amy aren’t home.
Where is your favorite place outside of your apartment?
Anywhere there are other dogs.  Or Parker’s, where I get a bath, because they give me treats constantly.  Constantly.
What are your favorite treats?
Peanut butter and raw hides.  The best is when there’s peanut butter on a raw hide!
How many toys do you have? Which ones are your favorite?
I chew through basically everything, and in an impressively short amount of time, if I do say so myself.  Unfortunately, this means Dirk and Amy stopped trying to find toys that could withstand my powerful jaw and raw determination awhile ago.  Now they only trust me with two rope toys, and I can’t choose between them.
What is your favorite way to pass time?
I love to hang out with other dogs, I love to sit outside Starbucks with Amy while Dirk gets them coffee so I can listen to strangers talk about how cute I am, and I love to play hide and seek.  So far, I’m only good at seeking, but if the day comes when I figure out how to hide, watch out!  Otherwise, I sleep.  Sleep is so great.  Except when Dirk and Amy want to sleep late, then it’s not so great.
What is one thing you think everyone should know about you?
I love attention!  From dogs, from kids, from adults, from whatever – I love it.  I will be super sweet to you and shower you with kisses (whether you want them or not) when you show me attention!  If you don’t give me the attention I want, however, I will find your sock (or shoe) and carry it around it my mouth.  Just to let you know you’re not paying attention to me.  You’ve been warned.
Any words of wisdom you want to share with everyone?
“It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.” J/k, I didn’t really say that, my namesake did!  But it’s pretty true, right?  So I’ll go with that.

So that’s Albus. Pretty cool, huh? Check back in another month to meet another McCormick Furry Friend. Wes will be back on Friday with more neat stuff!

Exciting Beginnings to Another Year

Well Folks,

Another wonderful new year has begun and we couldn’t be more thrilled. Along with the new year, you’ll notice a fresh look to CURE. We’re not quite finished with its redesign, so pardon our dust, we should be finished within the next couple weeks. With the redesign we hope to be more user friendly, and make it easier to share your feedback with us. If you’d like to comment on new posts, you’re welcome to do so. You can also reach us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/mccormick.recruit) and twitter (@MTSRecruit). Feel free to share any posts that you like with your friends on Facebook, your followers on twitter, or anyone else via email. Each new post also has buttons on the bottom of the page for easy social media sharing.

With the new year comes a new schedule of posts. We’ll have new and exciting content each week on Wednesday and Friday at noon, so check back often!

The CURE isn’t the only thing undergoing changes here at McCormick! McCormick has a new professor – Dr. Reggie Williams, professor of ethics, whom you’ll all meet in a few short weeks in a blog post. We also have a new class of wonderful students – 35 in all, from all walks of life. Our new class includes great people from Egypt and Korea, Chicago and Texas. From the Presbyterian church to the Catholic church, fresh out of college and those beginning a second or third career. Our new class of students is small, but full of really wonderful people excited to bring their diversity to McCormick.

Last week we oriented the new group of students to life at McCormick. Included this year was service together with Habitat for Humanity. Three groups of students worked at two construction sites and one ReStore in service to the Chicagoland community.

We’re so blessed to be graced by this new class and cannot wait for the future months and years in ministry with them. Check back Friday for a new Neighborhood Spotlight on our very own Hyde Park!

Peace.

Dr. Brad Braxton is preparing to leave McCormick after serving for the past two years as a Distinguished Visiting Scholar. He is a scholar, a preacher, a tireless advocate for issues of social justice and an engaging human being. He’s been a dynamic presence in our community and will certainly be missed by many of us. He is starting a new position at Southern Methodist University, Perkins School of Theology in the Lois Craddock Perkins Endowed Chair of Homiletics, the first African American to hold this position. His responsibilities include a full teaching load, mentoring students and working with his faculty colleagues. He will do all this while living with his family in Baltimore, Maryland where he has begun serving as the founding Senior Pastor of The Open Church, a new congregation located in the same city where he served in his first pastorate nearly 20 years ago.
Founding a new church was not something that happened overnight. Brad first envisioned The Open Church more than a decade ago (see CURE Blog post from April 17, 2012). Over the years, he has employed a great deal of thought, collaboration with others, frequent consultations with his family and the “wisdom circle” of clergy and other partners who have served as touchstones for him throughout his ministry. That, plus the serendipity of being called to SMC made it possible for him to launch the dream at this point in his life.
I asked Brad what advice and counsel he would offer someone who wanted to start a new church. What did he believe was at stake in such an undertaking? How does one begin at the beginning, and at the same time, begin with the end in mind? Brad believes you should know the goal of your leadership in starting a new church endeavor; you should he asserts, know “where you are going beyond your efforts to be ‘professionally holy.’ “ He reduced his advice to five essentials:
First, starting a church requires a sense of purpose. Brad believes you must “find that thing for which you are willing to die.” In other words, you have to be willing to take a risk and leave your old life behind you. It’s important, he adds, to have some knowledge of your own personality type and be comfortable in your own skin, and it helps to have a “questioning personality” that isn’t satisfied by the status quo or easy answers.
Second, don’t ignore the fact that structures of authority are being flattened and democratized; it’s important to recognize that you will continually need to hold democratization and collaboration in tension, along with your own understanding of pastoral authority. For Brad, pastoral authority is ultimately the bottom line; so he’s encouraging his leadership team at The Open Church to create a governing structure where there won’t ever be a need for him to break a tie vote. If that happens, he notes, his deciding vote will make it clear who’s in charge.
Third, you need to make certain that your family support system (in whatever configuration that takes) is part of your thinking and conversation from the start. The process of starting a new church (or revitalizing an old one) is time consuming, laborious and can be energy draining. It’s critical that your family be on board with you. It’s one of the reasons why he is adamant about supporting models of family life and church life that “promote fullness.”
Fourth, you need to ask yourself if this is the right time in your life and ministry to take this step. Where are you in your professional development that would make this the time to launch such an endeavor?
Fifth, and critically important: Ask yourself if you have the resources (or commitment from others for the resources) necessary to make this work. Give substantive and careful thought to what a start up budget for your dream church would look like. And don’t forget to take into account issues of space, necessary equipment, legal incorporation, liability insurance and salaries (for others, if not for yourself).

No one ever said that ministry was easy.  Starting a new church is even less so.  But if that leadership endeavor calls out to you, find a way to begin.   As Brad said in a lecture he delivered last year atFourth Presbyterian Church:   “Leadership is neutral; it doesn’t make any difference until you shift it into forward or reverse.”    Could a new church start be the way your leadership is taking you forward?

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